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ARCHIVES - South Asia Tsunami 2004
 
   
 FACTS
    REPORTS
   
 WOMEN
    SHELTER
    HUMAN RIGHTS
    ASSESSMENTS

FACTS

          INDIA
        
 INDONESIA
          MALDIVES
          SEYCHELLES
          SOMALIA
          SRI LANKA
      
    THAILAND

 

 

 

 INDIA

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities: 9,330. (Source: Government of India, Ministry of Home Affairs Report, May 25, 2005.)

Number of people missing: 3,077. (Source: Situation Report, No.32-5/2004-NDM-Government of India, Ministry of Home Affairs.)

Number of people displaced: 647,599. (Source: Situation Report, No.32-5/2004-NDM-Government of India, Ministry of Home Affairs.)

IMPACT ON VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

75 percent of the fatalities were women and children.

787 women became widows and 480 children were orphaned. (Source for all figures: Government of India, Ministry of Home Affairs Report, May 25, 2005).

DAMAGES AND LOSSES

An estimated 1,089 villages were affected in Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry, and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

An estimated 157,393 houses were destroyed.

Approximately 730,000 individuals were forced to leave their homes.

83,788 boats were damaged or destroyed.

31,755 livestock were lost.

39,035 hectares of cropped area was damaged. (Source for all figures: Government of India, Ministry of Home Affairs Report, May 25, 2005.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Total estimated value of damages: $2.56 billion.

Total estimated needs for long-term recovery: $2.1 billion.

Total funds secured for long-term recovery: $2.18 billion. (The Indian government's portion of these funds amounts to an estimated $1.38 billion. Total international donor pledges to India's recovery amount to approximately $800 million.) (Source: Government of India, June 2005. Includes estimates for the Andaman and Nicobar Islands as well as assistance to the shipping industry.)

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/india.asp

 INDONESIA

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities: 130,736, including 906 fatalities that occurred during the March 28, 2005 earthquake. (Source: The Reconstruction Agency for Aceh and Nias [BRR] and Indonesian Red Cross, June 18, 2005; Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [OCHA], June 2005.)

Number of people missing: 37,066. (Source: Indonesian Red Cross, June 18, 2005.)

Number of IDPs: 889,774. (Source: 2005 Population Census for Aceh and Nias, November 2005)

IMPACT ON VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

In Aceh province, male survivors outnumbered women by a ratio of almost 3:1. (Source: Oxfam, "Tsunami's Impact on Women," March 26, 2005.)

The tsunami severely damaged medical facilities and killed much of the female labor force. Of the 51 regional health centers with reproductive services, 41 were damaged, and 30 percent of midwives are reportedly dead or missing as a result of the tsunami. (United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], August 2005.)

DAMAGE AND LOSSES

600,000 people in Aceh province alone (25 percent of its population) lost their source of livelihood, including 130,000 farmers, 300,000 fishermen, and 170,000 small businesses. (Source: OCHA Indonesia, June 20, 2005.)

A total of 141,000 houses were destroyed in Aceh and Nias. (Source: BRR and World Bank, "Rebuilding a Better Aceh and Nias," October 2005.)

2,240 schools were destroyed in Aceh and Nias, and 2,364 education staff were killed. (Source: IOM; BRR, October 2005.)

592 health facilities were destroyed in Aceh. (Source: WHO, February 2005.)

Over 100,000 wells were contaminated with salt water or left in need of repair. (Source: United Nations Children's Fund [UNICEF] and OCHA, June 20, 2005.)

2,676 bridges were either destroyed or sustained major damage. (Source: IOM, Post-Tsunami Damage Assessment in NAD; IOM, Post Tsunami Damage Assessment in Nias and Simeulue Islands, June 2005.)

A total of 3,229 fishing vessels were lost or damaged. (Source: FAO; Department of Social Affairs, Government of Indonesia.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Total estimated value of damages: $4.5 billion.

Total estimated needs for long-term recovery: $5.0-$5.5 billion.

Total funds pledged for long-term recovery: $6.5 billion. Funds from non-governmental organizations (NGOs) comprise approximately $2.5 billion of this total figure. The remainder comes from multilateral and bilateral donors and international financial institutions. In addition, Indonesia's government will spend an estimated $2 billion on recovery. (Source: World Bank, July 2005; the funds from both NGOs and the Indonesian government are estimates.)

Total funds secured for long-term recovery: $4.5 billion. Of this, $2.5 billion have been secured from NGOs and $1.46 billion from multilateral and bilateral donors. (Source: World Bank, July 2005; NGO funds are estimates.)

Outstanding pledges (promised but not yet secured) from multilateral and bilateral donors: $2 billion. (Source: World Bank, July 2005.)

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/indonesia.asp

 MALDIVES

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities: 82. (Source: National Disaster Management Center [NDMC], November 2005.)

Number of missing: 26. (Source: NDMC, November 2005.)

Immediately after the tsunami, there were 29,577 IDPs. There are currently 11,231 IDPs. (Source: Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [OCHA], November 2005.)

IMPACT ON VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

At least 1,800 pregnant women--scattered across 200 islands--were impacted by the tsunami. 500 pregnant women were left without access to delivery facilities. (Source: United Nations Children's Fund [UNICEF], "In Maldives the Situation is Bleak," July 8, 2005; United Nations Populations Fund [UNFPA], "Tsunami Disaster: UNFPA Appeals to Donors for $28 Million for Women and Youth.")

A study of tsunami survivors and aid workers in Sri Lanka, the Maldives, Thailand, India, and Indonesia notes that displacement has increased the risk of abuse and exploitation of vulnerable groups, such as women and children. (Source: UC Berkeley, Human Rights Center Report, "After the Tsunami: Human Rights and Vulnerable Populations," June 6, 2005.)

DAMAGES AND LOSSES

Overall, there was $250 million in damage to the tourism sector. Tourism accounted for 62 percent of the country's pre-tsunami GDP directly. Since the tsunami, there has been a 25 percent downturn in the tourism industry. (Source: NDMC, June 2005.)

There was $14 million worth of damage to the fisheries sector, which accounted for 11 percent of the country's pre-tsunami labor force. (Source: NDMC, June 2005.)

53 of 199 inhabited islands were severely damaged. (Source: NDMC, June 2005.)

Approximately 6,000 houses are in need of repair or rebuilding. (Source: NDMC, June 2005.)

19 of the 83 operating resorts were forced to close due to damage. (Source: NDMC, June 2005.)

Approximately 43 health facilities on the islands were damaged. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator's Office, November 2005.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Total damages are estimated to be $470 million, 62 percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). (Source: Joint World Bank, Asian Development Bank [ADB], United Nations Needs Assessment, February 2005.)

Total estimated needs for long-term recovery: $375 million.

Total funds secured from international donors for long-term recovery: $256.5 million.

The Maldives has a gap of $122 million for post-tsunami recovery needs. In addition, it faces a $94 million budgetary shortfall in 2005 as the decline in tourism has led to a drastic reduction in income, budgetary receipts, and foreign exchange.

(Source: Government of Maldives, June 2005; International Monetary Fund [IMF], June 2005).

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/maldives.asp

 SEYCHELLES

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities: 3. (Source: US Agency for International Development [USAID].)

The estimated number of people displaced varies. According to the UN Country Team in the Seychelles, 40 households were displaced.

DAMAGES AND LOSSES

The five priority areas most in need of reconstruction and rehabilitation were road infrastructure, housing, fisheries, infrastructure, and an early warning system.

The livelihoods of approximately 1,200 families in the fishery sector and 300 families in the agricultural sector were affected. (Source: UN Indian Ocean Flash Appeal, Midterm Review, April 6, 2005.)

Approximately 500 houses and five schools were affected on the Mahe and Praslin Islands. (Source: UN Indian Ocean Flash Appeal, Midterm Review, April 6, 2005.)

Environmental damage has been estimated at $1.5 million. (Source: UN Indian Ocean Flash Appeal, Midterm Review, April 6, 2005.)

Seawater and debris contaminated the fresh water in the coastal areas. (Source: Small Island and Developing States Network, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs [UNDESA].)

Mangrove forests, swamps along the coast, and coral reefs were destroyed. (Source: Small Island and Developing States Network, UNDESA, January 7, 2005.)

Three bridges and stretches of coastal roads are in need of reconstruction. (Source: World Bank, February 2005.)

Approximately 5 percent of hotels will require restoration. (Source: World Bank and IMF, February 2005.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Major infrastructure expenses will be met by the government through a contingency fund.

A damage assessment undertaken by the government's National Disaster Committee assessed total damages at $31 million. (Source: UN Indian Ocean Flash Appeal, Midterm Review, April 6, 2005.)

In its Flash Appeal, the UN appealed for $8.9 million to cover urgent requirements in priority areas. In the mid-term review of the Flash Appeal, this figure was updated to $11.56 million. Of this, $2.96 million has been pledged. (Source: Expenditure Tracking, Flash Appeals, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [OCHA].)

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/seychelles.asp

 SOMALIA

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities and people missing: 289. (Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [OCHA] Tsunami Inter-agency Assessment Mission October, 2005.)

Number of IDPs: 5,000. (Source: OCHA, January 2005.)

IMPACT ON VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

In total, approximately 44,000 people were affected by the tsunami. Of this, 40 percent faced a livelihood crisis and 5 percent were classified as undergoing a humanitarian emergency. (Source: OCHA Tsunami Inter-agency Assessment Mission, March 30, 2005.)

DAMAGES AND LOSSES

Somalia was the most severely impacted country in Africa. Damages were concentrated in the Hafun, Bender Beyla, Dharin Raqas, and Kulub areas.

600 fishing boats were destroyed. (Source: OCHA, Tsunami Inter-agency Assessment Mission, March 30, 2005.)

2,000 concrete structures were destroyed of which 1,400 were houses. (Source: OCHA, Tsunami Inter-agency Assessment Mission, March 30, 2005.)

50 percent of the affected population was left in need of sustained resource transfers in the form of cash and/or food assistance until the next fishing season in October 2005. (Source: OCHA, Tsunami Inter-agency Assessment Mission, March 30, 2005.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

More than $10 million was requested in the UN Flash Appeal. (Source: OCHA Somalia October 2005)

Of this, $7.8 million was received. (Source: OCHA Somalia, October 2005)

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/somalia.asp

 SRI LANKA

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities: 35,322. (Source: Government of Sri Lanka, November 2005.)

Number of IDPs: 516,150. (Source: Government of Sri Lanka, November 2005.)

14 out of 28 districts were affected. (Source: Government of Sri Lanka, August 2005.)

IMPACT ON VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

40,000 widows, orphans, elderly, and disabled individuals were left in need of long-term or permanent income support. (Source: International Labor Organization [ILO] Sri Lanka, June 2005.)

65 percent of men have regained some source of income and 55 percent of women have. (Source: ILO Sri Lanka, June 2005.)

DAMAGES AND LOSSES

In the affected areas, 90 percent of working men and women lost their sources of livelihood. (Source: ILO Sri Lanka, June 2005.)

23,449 acres of cultivated land were affected, including 9,000 acres of paddy, 645 acres of other crop fields, 27,710 home garden units, 559 acres of vegetable farms, and 317 acres of fruit trees. (Source: Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO]; Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture, August 2005.)

65,275 houses were completely damaged and 38,561 houses partially damaged but are still habitable. (Source: TAFREN, November 2005.)

16,919 fishing boats were damaged or destroyed, representing approximately 75 percent of the total fishing fleet. (Source: Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture; FAO Sri Lanka.)

Some 100 hospitals/dispensaries, Ministry of Health offices, and health centers were completely or partially damaged. (Source: World Health Organization [WHO] Sri Lanka, August 2005.)

A total of 195 educational facilities including universities and vocational training centers were damaged with 59 schools totally destroyed and 117 partially damaged. (Source: TAFREN, August 2005.)

More than 60,000 wells were contaminated or destroyed. (Source: World Bank/Asian Development Bank/Japan Bank of International Cooperation, Joint Needs Assessment.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Total estimated value of damages: $1.5 billion. (Source: Joint Needs Assessment, January 2005.)

Total estimated needs for long-term recovery: $2.15 billion.

Total funds pledged for long-term recovery: $2.95 billion. Funds from NGOs comprise approximately $853 million of this figure. The remainder comes from multilateral and bilateral donors. (Source: External Resources Department, Ministry of Finance and Planning, Government of Sri Lanka, November 2005.)

Total funds secured for long-term recovery: $2.24 billion. (Source: External Resources Department, Ministry of Finance and Planning, Government of Sri Lanka, November 2005.)

Outstanding pledges (promised but not yet secured) from multilateral and bilateral donors: $710 million. (Source: External Resources Department, Ministry of Finance and Planning, Government of Sri Lanka, November 2005.)

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/srilanka.asp

 THAILAND

HUMAN TOLL

Number of fatalities: 8,212. (Source: Government of Thailand. Note that this figure includes 2,448 non-Thai people from 37 other countries.)

Number of people missing: 2,817. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator, Thailand.)

Number of people displaced: 6,000. (Source: UN Development Program [UNDP], Six Month Cumulative Totals, June 2005.)

IMPACT ON VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

An estimated 50,000 children were affected by the tsunami, and, according to the Ministry of Education, an estimated 1,480 children lost one or both parents. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator, Thailand, Situation Report No. 19, October, 2005.)

More women than men were killed in the tsunami. The UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) warns that this may render children more vulnerable to forms of abuse, including sexual exploitation. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator, Thailand, May 13, 2005.)

DAMAGES AND LOSSES

Six southern provinces along the Andaman coastline were severely impacted.

Over 120,000 individuals working in the tourism sector lost their jobs. An additional 30,000 individuals employed in the fisheries sector lost their sources of livelihood. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator, Thailand, Six Month Report.)

A total of 4,806 houses were affected. Of these, 3,302 were completely destroyed, and 1,504 were partially damaged. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator, Thailand, Situation Report No. 11, April 1, 2005.)

Approximately 5,000 boats were lost or damaged. (Source: UN Resident Country Team Thailand, November 2005.)

2,000 hectares of agricultural land were destroyed. (Source: UN Country Team Thailand, November 2005.)

A total of 305 acres of mangroves, 3,600 acres of coral, and 400 seagrass beds were impacted. (Source: UN Country Team Thailand, November 2005.)

102 large ponds, 2,321 wells, and two ground wells were contaminated. (Source: UN Country Team Thailand, November 2005.)

The loss of income in the tourist industry is estimated to be $25 million monthly. (Source: Thailand Development Research Institute, Department of Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, July 7, 2005.)

The Thai Hotels Association estimated that hotel occupancy fell by 20 percent in 2005. Current Thailand Tourism Authority figures suggest that Andaman region arrivals are down by 30 percent. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator Thailand.)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Losses are estimated at $1.6 billion and costs of repairing damage at $482 million. (Source: UN Country Team Thailand, November 2005.)

A total of $21.4 million was requested in humanitarian assistance through the Flash Appeal. Of that, Thailand received $18 million, of which $7.5 million has been spent as of November 2005. (Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs [OCHA] Expenditure Tracking System.) A further $38.3 million is being delivered in mid- to long-term recovery programming for 2005-06. (Source: UN Resident Coordinator, Thailand, June 21, 2005.)

http://www.tsunamispecialenvoy.org/country/thailand.asp


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